Can You Lose Weight By Eating 700 Calories A Day The 7 Macrominerals – Essential Nutrients For All Round Health

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The 7 Macrominerals – Essential Nutrients For All Round Health

Macrominerals are the seven main minerals your body needs to function properly. They support your body with a wide range of functions, including maintaining fluid balance, stimulating metabolism, and regulating blood pressure. In this article I will cover each seven in more detail.

1) Calcium

Calcium was discovered by Sir Humphrey Davy in 1808. Approximately 1.5% of the average adult’s body weight is made up of this nutrient. An important role of calcium in the body is to promote strong bones and teeth. It helps regulate blood pressure, muscle contraction and nerve transmission.

The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for calcium increases with age. Children aged 0-6 months need only 210 mg per day, while adults 51 years and older need 1200 mg per day. Dairy products are generally the best sources of this macromineral, with high levels of cheese (721mg per 100g), milk (114mg per 100ml) and yogurt (200mg per 100g).

Consuming 3000mg or more of calcium per day can cause dehydration, diarrhoea, nausea, abdominal pain and vomiting. Failing to consume the RDA is just as bad and can lead to high blood pressure, muscle cramps and osteoporosis (low bone density).

2) Chloride

Chloride was discovered as a compound in 1774 by Carl Wilhelm Scheele. It was later isolated by Sir Humphrey Davy in 1807. About 0.15% of an average adult’s body weight is chloride. This macromineral has several roles in the body, including aiding in the production of glandular hormones, maintaining blood pressure, maintaining fluid balance, removing waste products from the body, and supporting metabolism.

The RDA for chloride increases with age. Children aged 0-6 years need about 180 mg per day while adults need 750 mg per day. The best food sources of this nutrient include butter (1300 mg per 100 g), olives (300 mg per 100 g) and whole grain bread (860 mg per 100 g).

Although there is no recommended upper limit (UL) for chloride, some people experience respiratory problems, fluid retention, and high blood pressure if they consume large amounts. Not consuming enough of this nutrient can have adverse effects on your body, leading to muscle cramps and weakness.

3) Magnesium

Magnesium was initially discovered in 1618 by Henry Wicker in the form of ‘Epsom salts’. It was later isolated in 1808 by Sir Humphrey Davy. Magnesium makes up approximately 0.05% of the average adult’s body weight. It is responsible for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the human body, including stimulating metabolism, relaxing muscles and nerves, and supporting healthy bone growth.

The RDA for magnesium increases with age. Children ages 0-6 months need only 30 mg per day of this macromineral, but adults 31 years and older need significantly more (men need 420 mg per day, women need 320 mg per day, and pregnant women need 360 mg per day). Rich food sources of this nutrient include almonds (279 mg per 100 g), Brazil nuts (229 mg per 100 g) and spinach (87 mg per 100 g) with high levels.

Consuming 1000mg or more of magnesium per day can cause a number of negative symptoms, including diarrhea, fatigue and stomach cramps. Failure to get enough of this nutrient can have negative effects and can lead to muscle cramps, nausea, numbness and vomiting.

4) Phosphorus

Phosphorus was accidentally discovered in 1669 by the German alchemist Henning Brandt in an experiment trying to convert metals into gold. It represents about 1% of the average adult’s body weight. The main role of phosphorus is to work in conjunction with calcium and promote the development of strong bones and teeth. It activates B-complex vitamins and helps in the production of genetic information carriers – deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA).

The RDA for this macromineral varies with age. Children aged 0-6 months should consume only 100 mg of this nutrient per day. This requirement increases to 1250mg per day for children aged 9-18 but drops to 700mg per day for adults aged 19 and over. High-protein foods are a good way to get your daily phosphorus, with beef fillet steak (265 mg per 100 g), cheddar cheese (520 mg per 100 g) and chicken (190 mg per 100 g) all very rich sources.

Excess phosphorus in the body is very rare and only develops as a result of kidney disease, which then leads to soft tissue calcification (a condition in which calcium is deposited on soft tissues). Not having enough phosphorus in the body is very rare and usually only develops as a side effect of certain diseases. When a deficiency develops it can lead to anemia (low red blood cell count), osteomalacia (softening of the bones) and weakness.

5) Potassium

Early humans were aware of potassium compounds but it was not isolated until Sir Humphrey Davy managed to extract this nutrient from vegetable alkali in 1807. Approximately 0.35% of an average person’s body weight is potassium. It has many roles including maintaining fluid balance in the body, promoting muscle growth, regulating blood pressure and supporting a healthy metabolism.

The RDA for potassium increases with age. Children 0-6 months should consume 400 mg per day and adults 19 years and older should consume 4.7 grams more per day. Plant-based foods are very rich in this macromineral, with bananas (350 mg per 100 g), dried apricots (1880 mg per 100 g) and spinach (490 mg per 100 g) being particularly good sources.

Your body regulates blood levels of this nutrient very tightly so overdoses are rare and usually only occur as a result of disease or infection. Symptoms of potassium overdose include diarrhea, nausea, and ulcers. Deficiencies are also uncommon and usually develop only as a result of digestive problems. Symptoms of this nutrient deficiency include confusion, dry skin and muscle cramps.

6) Sodium

Sodium compounds have been known since ancient times but were not isolated until Sir Humphy Davy made a breakthrough in 1807. Sodium is about 0.15% of the average adult’s body weight. It has several roles in the body, including making minerals soluble in the blood, maintaining joint flexibility, promoting a healthy metabolism, and supporting the body’s vital organs.

The RDA for this macromineral is 1600mg for men and women, although individuals with high blood pressure are advised to keep their intake below 1500mg per day. The richest food source of sodium is table salt which contains 38850mg of the nutrient. However, cheddar cheese (610 mg per 100 g), olives (1800 mg per 100 g) and shrimp (1590 mg per 100 g) are also good food sources.

Eating too much sodium is a very common problem and can lead to fluid retention, high blood pressure, heart disease and kidney disease. In contrast, not consuming enough sodium is rare and usually caused by other conditions that remove this nutrient from the body. When deficiencies occur it can cause confusion, headaches and nausea.

7) Sulphur

Sulfur has been known since biblical times but was not recognized as an element until 1777. During this time the French chemist Antoine Lavoisier proved to the scientific community that it should be classified as one. Approximately 0.25% of the average person’s body weight is sulfur. The main function of this macromineral is to treat joint and skin diseases. It helps keep hair, nails and skin healthy and supports proper metabolism.

There is no official RDA for sulfur but most sources suggest you should try to consume between 800mg and 1000mg per day. Protein-rich foods such as Brazil nuts (290 mg per 100 g), chicken (300 mg per 100 g) and eggs (180 mg per 100 g) contain the highest levels of this nutrient.

Consuming too much or too little sulfur rarely has an adverse effect. In fact overdose symptoms are not reported and deficiencies only affect people who eat a low protein diet. If people are deficient in sulfur it can lead to arthritis, circulatory problems, inflammation and skin problems.

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