How Much Weight Can The Average 15 Year Old Lift Caveman Nutrition: Is This The Right Way To Eat For Fat Loss

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Caveman Nutrition: Is This The Right Way To Eat For Fat Loss

John Williams, Ph.D., has degrees in archeology and anthropology. His research and field work focused on the Paleolithic and Neolithic of the “Old World”, meaning the Stone Age of Europe, Africa and Asia. John was very interested in food, which works very well in prehistoric studies, because our past is a great quest for food.

CB: John, you have an interesting background. Let’s talk about the North American diet for muscle and fat loss. What’s new in nutrition for athletes, fat loss and health?

JW:

I try to stay in the nutrition literature for my own good, but I don’t want to talk about nutrition for athletes. Others like John Berardi, who makes a living in this field, may be better off talking about the latest and greatest style.

I’ve been reading a lot about fish oil lately, and its positive effects on overall health and the body. Adding a little fish oil to your diet is one of the easiest ways to boost your metabolism. Recent research has shown that as little as 3 grams of EPA and DHA (both omega-3 fatty acids) can speed up your metabolism by 400 k/cal per day.

These long-chain fatty acids have great health benefits, including brain health, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, better blood sugar management, and more. So, by doing something as simple as popping two caps of fish oil at every meal, you can live a longer, leaner, and brainier life!

CB: John, do you have any other superfoods that you think should be in everyone’s diet?

JW:

Fish oil would be one, for the reasons given in the previous answer. Another must have in everyone’s diet is spinach. Among the leafy greens, spinach provides some of the best benefits in terms of vitamins and micronutrients. It is packed with important phytochemicals, vitamin A, vitamin B, calcium, phosphorus, iron, folate and potassium.

But that’s not all! Spinach is also one of the most high-alcohol foods, which means it helps reduce the acidity that is common with high-protein foods. Therefore, by adding more spinach to the diet, we can relieve a lot of stress on the muscles and bones.

I also think that most people can benefit from simply increasing their daily consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits. I’m not talking about juice or V8, but the real thing: every color and type of vegetable and fruit you know. It’s not breaking news, but fresh fruits and vegetables offer many benefits, from anti-cancer properties to improving blood lipids to increased energy.

Another grain-based food that I think many people will benefit from is quinoa (pronounced “KEEN-oowa”). It is a cereal from South America cultivated by the Incas, which grows on a plant similar to spinach. Therefore, it is “leafy rice” and not a grass seed like wheat and corn.

Quinoa is gluten-free, and contains no allergens common to grains from the grass family such as wheat, rye, barley, oats, and corn. In addition, quinoa contains lysine, an amino acid lacking in many grains, making it a complete protein. Quinoa is also an excellent source of calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus and B vitamins. It’s one of the good guys in the grain family, so grab some the next time you’re at the grocery store. a whole.

CB: Are there any dietary fat loss myths you’d like to clear up?

JW:

When it comes to the recent pendulum swing to low-carb diets, it seems that many people have used this as an excuse not to eat vegetables. A low-carb diet certainly has its benefits for many people, but there’s no excuse to avoid eating a lot of broccoli for fear of a few extra carbs. If it’s not covered in margarine, broccoli (or insert greens here) can do nothing but good.

CB: Thanks John. I believe that eating high fiber vegetables is one of the keys to getting, and staying lean. How do you think a person should eat to lose weight? Is eating to be fat the same as being thin?

JW:

Let me answer the last question first: The ideal situation is to learn how to eat to maximize your performance and health goals, and eat just as much or more based on the amount of muscle you want to gain and the fat you want to lose. . In other words, eating fat and eating fat will differ only in terms of calories burned overall.

There are certainly cases where a person can benefit from an extreme diet like Atkins to eliminate overindulgence and bad food choices, but the risk is always there that the person will relapse if not learning how to eat properly.

So how do you eat to get (and stay) thin? I have a few simple rules, like calorie balance, enough protein, lots of vegetables and fruit, no processed carbs out the window after exercise, balanced fats – and let’s not forget the other side of the coin. : work (can be a mix of weight lifting and cardio). Sure, there’s a lot of detail in these rules, and tricks to make it work for your own purposes, but it boils down to these simple rules.

My good friend John Berardi has talked a lot about how some people have a tendency to replace hard lifting, and even healthy eating, with gaining knowledge. These people have average or even poor physiques, yet all their time is spent in pursuit of the holy grail of fitness and nutritional knowledge. How many carbs are in 5.8 oz of artichokes, and how do they affect insulin levels? Who cares, just eat the damn thing and go lift heavy! The fact is that you have to work hard in the gym to get a good body, in addition to knowing how to get up and eat.

Of course, the road goes in two directions, and there are still a bunch of people who don’t know artichoke from Twinkie, but the key is not to get lost in the minutia and ignore what is really important: balanced and solid food. training.

CB: I have a Ph.D. in archaeology, and you did research on evolution and nutrition, right? What lessons did you learn from your studies? How did the food come out? Does it vary geographically?

JW:

That’s right, Craig. We archaeologists love to scoff at “Paleo-diets” and books like Neanderthin. There was no single paleo-diet; People during the Paleolithic ate ​​what they could, and what they ate depended on where they lived. I recently spoke with Erik Trinkaus, a paleoanthropologist and foremost expert on Neanderthals, and he summed up his thoughts on the matter by saying, “The Neanderthal world is not very interesting. It had life. These people are difficult and die young, and the meaning of the paleo diet is to eat what they did not eat before”.

That being said, there are some lessons we can learn from the past that can help us understand why we have so many food-related problems today.

I have a few simple lessons from the archaeological record about food:

1) Eat more protein and less of everything else.

In short, we have been eating a diet rich in plants, fish and animals for millions of years. Many studies published in peer-reviewed journals show that consuming more than 10-15% of the country’s protein intake has positive benefits for body composition and blood lipids.

2) Get your carbs from the source.

Paleolithic people didn’t have Krispy Kreme, otherwise they would be as fat as the sugar junkies you are today. Outside of the exercise window, when simple sugars and fast-absorbing proteins are preferred, we can benefit from avoiding all the processed foods that line our supermarket aisles, and choose to eat in the original, pure state. If you looked in my kitchen cabinet, you would find a variety of grains and legumes: quinoa, barley, chopped figs, oat bran, wheat, lentils, split pumpkin, and nuts.

3) Eat vegetables and fruits.

It’s clear that we evolved to reap the benefits of a diet rich in vegetables and fruits, given the remains of literally hundreds of plant species at sites like Ohalo II , a 23,000-year-old fishing camp on the sea. from Galilee. I never realized how many veggie haters there are until I started trying to get my friends and family to eat them.

After months of abstinence, I convinced a good friend of mine to increase her vegetable intake. She wasn’t fat at all, but she was getting frustrated with the tire that was slowly growing around her waist. I gave him recipes to make things like broccoli and spinach tastier, and he eventually took my advice. After this change, she is thinner than she has ever been in her life, and she keeps telling me how much energy she has.

4) Balance these fats.

This is an issue that is very relevant to my previous research. It is interesting to note that the deviation of fatty acids in the modern Western diet is towards saturated fats and omega-6, at the expense of monounsaturated and omega-3. In the not-so-distant past, this would not have been possible, because wild animals generally do not store fat, and they were not fed corn to increase omega-6 in their fat. In addition, our ancestors got more omega-3 from plants, animals and fish. In general, we seem to have evolved on a diet with good monounsaturated fats from nuts, seeds, and animals, as well as almost as much omega-6 as omega-3. Years of studies have shown that a high omega-6 to omega-3 ratio helps prevent heart disease, diabetes, and obesity, while getting more balanced fatty acids, including Adequate monounsaturated fats protect against these health problems. What is the solution? Free-range meat and eggs are always good choices, and when you buy meat from farm animals, go for the leanest kind. Dump the corn oil in your cupboard and replace it with olive oil, and then eat more fish and/or add flax and fish oil.

CB: Thanks John. Good information. Simple instructions. Focus on natural foods.

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